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Environment

Save money, prevent pollution

Save money, prevent pollution

Did you know the energy used in the average home can cause twice the greenhouse gas emissions of a car?

There are several ways you can reduce your carbon foot print and September is the perfect time to start making changes.  That is because the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) is promoting pollution prevention.

The Federal Pollution Prevention Act, passed in 1990, made a declaration that pollution should be prevented or reduced at its source whenever possible.  To honor this anniversary, ADEQ urges the public to prevent pollution in their day to day lives.

How to prepare for autumn insects

How to prepare for autumn insects

It's nearly fall, and the weather's getting cooler. That means all the critters who may normally hang around outside - such as ants, mice and spiders - will be looking to move into warmer spaces. Like your home.

So how can you get make sure these uninvited guests don't just come in and make themselves at home? Terminix has a few tips:

  • Move piles of firewood and other debris away from the home’s foundation. Both provide ample sources of shelter for rodents and other pests and could encourage them to live near the home.
  • Seal any holes or cracks in your home’s exterior. Rodents can squeeze through openings smaller than ¼ inch, and spiders, roaches and other pests need even less room than that. Large openings should be stuffed with steel wool or wire mesh before sealing with caulk.
  • Ensure attic and foundation vents are equipped with tight-fitting ¼ inch hardware cloth.

ADEQ to take comment on water treatment

ADEQ to take comment on water treatment

The Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) will be holding a public meeting and hearing on September 7 to accept public comments on a draft renewal general permit for wastewater discharges from water treatment plants.

The meeting will begin at 2:00 p.m.

Heat, pollution and you

Heat, pollution and you

GOOD UP HIGH, BAD NEARBY

On an average summer day in Central Arkansas, gasoline powered lawn and garden equipment will release more pollutants into the air than a typical large industrial power plant.  That’s why Arkansans can make such an impact on smog in their area during ozone season and in turn help their neighbors breathe a little easier this time of year.

Ground-level ozone is the main ingredient in smog.  Air pollutants can come from cars, trucks, buses and industrial smoke stacks.  They can also come from gas stations, outboard motors, oil-based paints, cleaning solvents, lawn mowers, and farm and construction equipment.  When those pollutants heat up in the summer sun there is a reaction and the result produces ozone smog.

Although ozone in the upper atmosphere filters out harmful ultraviolet radiation, it can cause numerous breathing problems at ground level.  An easy way to remember the difference is this

Corps concerned with rising number of deaths at its parks

Corps concerned with rising number of deaths at its parks

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - The U.S.

What burn bans mean for you

What burn bans mean for you

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Arkansas Forestry Commission crews have suppressed seven wildfires that burned 29 acres over the past 24 hours. AFC dozer crews from Sebastian and Logan County are working with local emergency personnel to contain a wildfire on the southwest side of Fort Chaffee near Greenwood.

AFC dozer crews were dispatched at 1:35 p.m. Wednesday to contain the wildfire that is now estimated at 250 acres. Four dozer crews worked the fire yesterday and the single engine air tankers made approximately 22 water drops. One home was lost and approximately 30 other homes were threatened by the blaze.

Star-gazing in central Arkansas

Star-gazing in central Arkansas

Do you have an interest in star-gazing?  This star-gazing has nothing to do with the "Britanny Spears" kind, however, and is hosted by the Central Arkansas Astronomical Society (http://www.caasastro.org/).  Saturday, July 23, 2011, between 9-11 p.m.,  join amateur astronomers at the Pinnacle Mountain vistor's center for an evening of the stars and other celestial phenomena.

Park public relations say, "As twilight settles in, the Central Arkansas Astronomical Society will provide telescopes for viewing objects in the night sky.  If cloudy skies prevent observation, an indoor program on astronomy will be presented at 9:00 p.m."

The love of the night sky does not stop with the Saturday evening Star Party as the fun carries over into Sunday, July 24 from 9-11 p.m. with a Star-gazing Cruise hosted by Pinnacle Mountain park interpretors.